June 24, 2006

Automatic For The People

When David Ortiz rounded third and headed home, he said his teammates "were kind of looking at me like a whole bunch of 10 year olds like, 'you're amazing'".

Can you blame them?


SoSH Drocca:
Although I'm sure everything has been said:
Doesn't anyone else think this is just a little weird?
Bizarre? Something?
I mean this is just not the way life or baseball actually works.

6 comments:

Yaz-Tex said...

At what point did the man, Babe Ruth, become the legend of the same name? When did it become clear that Willie Mays was more than just a superlative five-tool player, but a national treasure and future Hall of Famer in the making? Was there a specific game or at-bat when men of my father’s generation first fell silent in awe at the preternatural hitting prowess of Ted Williams?

With each successive walk-off HR and his growing legend for coming through in the clutch, one can’t help but feel that we’re watching baseball history in the person of David Americo Ortiz. It’s an absolutely sublime feeling to watch this story unfold, one that I can’t help but feel I’ll be sharing with my grandchildren one day down the road.

BlackJack said...

Too true yaz-tex. We've been very lucky around here over the past 5-10 years both in baseball and football. Pedro, Brady, Vinatieri and Ortiz just to name a few of the players whom you just have a conviction about. Players that just seem to be on a whole other level. It's really been great.

Y Papi es muy bueno

Yaz-Tex said...

The Brett Myers sub-plot to yesterday's thrilling events at Fenway is the subject of the CHB's column in today's Globe.

Over his career, Shaughnessy has proven to be a prolific writer, though too often his opinions and theories (i.e., The Curse) seem to have been aired more in the interest of self-promotion than in the quest to inform and entertain his readers.

However, like the proverbial blind squirrel who ocassionally finds an acorn, CHB hits the nail on the head with his opinions on the manner in which the Phillies (and, by inclusion, MLB) mishandled the Myers situation.

Long-time denizens of the Nation will recognize and remember the two examples DS cites from Sox miscreants past (Wil Cordero; Wes Gardner), and the manner in which the club took swift strides to handle each in a way that sent a clear and unequivocal manner.

Contrast these episodes with the comments of Myers' mealy-mouthed apologists, Pat Gillick and Charley Manuel, and you'll have another reason to thank your lucky stars that you're not a Phillies fan.

Myers' biggest regret? That his battery on his wife "had to get public". Kudos to Dan Shaugnessy for putting this incident and the subsequent handling of same by PHI in its proper, sordid perspective.

Peter N said...

What a moment! It's now Sunday morning in Hartford, and with the rain shield moving north and east, the game looks iffy at best. I have a live link for the radar loop if you want to check it out, at my blog. You have to copy and paste, but only once. Thereafter, just return to it with the history function. The rain is moving the WRONG way, right AT our Fenway.

redsock said...

I listened to the Phillies radio broadcast of the game at work and the radio guys did not mention Myers's name (or any booing) once all afternoon.

So he regrets not having the wisdom to realize he should have beaten her in private, not out in public? That's great.

However, I didn't have a problem with him pitching. As the CHB wrote, he is innocent until proven guilty (despite the number of witnesses) and he still has a right to go to work.

L-girl said...

I listened to the Phillies radio broadcast of the game at work and the radio guys did not mention Myers's name (or any booing) once all afternoon.

McMoron and Buck talked about it. Buck said what you're saying, with strong condemnation for the act, but in defense of the man's right to work until judgement is rendered.

However, I didn't have a problem with him pitching. As the CHB wrote, he is innocent until proven guilty (despite the number of witnesses) and he still has a right to go to work.

Even I agree with this. Plus every day he pitches is another opportunity for the public to voice their disgust at domestic violence by booing him. Charlie Manuel was quoted as saying he's sure Myers will be boo'd at home, too.